Writing Groups: The Right One

Last month, I attended the UW-Madison Continuing Studies Writers’ Institute, which was tremendous. The last presentation of the Institute was a panel discussion about how to keep our enthusiasm for writing alive after the conference. Spending two or three full days attending back-to-back sessions all pertaining to writing-related topics, surrounded by and hobnobbing with editors, agents, bookstore owners, published authors, and other writers, breathes new life into our writing dreams. We realize once again that, yes, they are possible. We, too, can one day be the next Michael Perry or Anne Lamott, and we are flooded with renewed passion to make those dreams come to fruition. But then we get back to our everyday lives, and before we know it—poof!—our enthusiasm and passion—along with our dreams—have gone up in smoke.

So how do we maintain our passion and enthusiasm for our writing post-conference? At the top of the panel’s list: join a writers group if you haven’t already done so.

A good writers group does several things:

  • takes you and your writing seriously
  • encourages and supports your accomplishments
  • helps you become a better writer through praise and constructive criticism
  • helps you stay focused by providing a deadline—the kick in the pants all writers need
  • refers you to copyeditors, proofreaders, cover designers, editors, agents, and writing classes and conferences

Having a consistent, equally committed group of people in your corner, and you in theirs, is a key factor that fuels the flame of enthusiasm in a writer’s spirit. Without it, all writers—and their writing dreams—perish.

However, notice that I said a good writers group. By “good” I mean one that is the right fit for you. For example, if you prefer a more structured format, a loose, informal one will most likely set your nerves on edge. And if you’re a gregarious Chatty Kathy, a group of serious No-Nonsense Neds will not be your crowd. As with dating, where we all must fish awhile before finding and hooking the “right one,” sometimes writers must shop around before they find the group that is the “right one.” So be patient. As in dating, the right one is worth the wait.

For those of you who don’t yet have a writers group, here are some helpful resources to aid in your search:

  • your local library
  • independent and big-box bookstores
  • writing.meetup.com (search by zip code)
  • www.writerscafe.org
  • start your own, in person or online

And for those of you who have found your “right one” (writing group and otherwise), be grateful for the gift, don’t take it for granted, and be sure to be a gift in return.

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